Tuesday, October 6, 2015

Plants and Stones

Ten years ago planning my garden I wanted to set some big boulders between or near the planting area. There are many of  granite boulders in the woods around my summer cottage, that had been left by a glacier from the time it had gone. As I learned, one time Rock Gardens were usually designed to imitate native plants growing in natural stone outcroppings.


Today, though, rocks and boulders have become of using  in a naturalistic style to accentuate just about any kind of planting area, from bogs to a complex deserts. For these purposes some years ago I have found out the more traditional kinds of perennial for rock garden plants. These tend to be compact in size, many of them originated in the mountain regions of the world, and most of them have to be quite hardy. In one of last posts I've written about my small rock garden, so I continue to tell you how I use boulders in the garden.
I planted a lot of evergreens like a euonymus fortunei 'Emerald gold' and 'Gaiety', dwarf golden thuja, juniper,  Chamaecyparis Pisifera, rhododendrons. Between them several species of hostas and yellow flowering Potentilla grow.


I have chosen flowers for planting near stones:
Gypsophila, I love its spreading mat of greyish foliage, abundant clusters of white flowers from late Spring until early Summer grow near the pond. Daisy
and Geranium were planted near thuja and juniper.  Daisy has now been hybridized to include double flowering varieties in shades of white, pink, rose-red or purple 
Many species and varieties of Primula and annual Begonia are the best for planting near boulders. Bright green Sedum leaves covered with small, star shaped, red and golden flowers grow between stones as well. Saxifrage, an evergreen perennial that forms cushions of moss-like fine foliage and produces pretty, cream colored flowers, Periwinkle with blue flowers grow along the low stone wall that separates a bed and a lawn.


Some landscapers call rocks and boulders of "stone beads" in the gardens. I do not know whether they are right or wrong, but boulders help me to take care of flower beds, because of grass doesn't grow among the flowers and shrubs.


Do you use stones and boulders in your garden? What do you think they can take place in garden design?


40 comments:

  1. Thank you for inspiring me about the stone border for the bed. Look so interesting.

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    1. Yes, Endah, they really do. Thank you!

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  2. I like it that you have used natural stones. I don't like artificial ones much in a garden except when a "conceptual" look is aimed for. (I mean by that, that the garden is supposed to represent an idea or a historical period.) I think that if the garden is simply to show off flowers and provide a pleasant environment, then everything should look as if it is inspired by the natural world.

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    1. I completely agree with you, Jenny. I wanted my garden to look very natural, and on the other hand, practical to maintain it.

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  3. I love your gardens with the rocks. When we cleared beds to start with, I moved all the larger stones/boulders into the planting areas. The smaller ones I use for dry creek beds or small walls. I don't use them for edging like you do because I'm too lazy to keep it trimmed. :-) Everything looks lovely.

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    1. Judy, trimming has to be, you're right. No very often though, I usually do it once in fortnight.

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  4. We acquired some rocks from a friends garden any years ago. I think that they were the remains of a cottage. They have been moved around the garden and used in several ways over the years.

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    1. It's interesting Sue that you could use the rocks in several ways. I know to move them is very hard work!

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  5. Hello, Nadezda!
    Your stone borders are beautiful and you have planted gorgeous plants near them.
    How much work in carrying those big boulders and placing them nicely!
    Oh, your garden is lovely!

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    1. Thank you Sara, when I moved them I was a little younger :))

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  6. Your boulders and stones are beautiful, Nadezda! I especially like the ones near your pond. I have used stones to make my pond but, because I had so many free bricks, I used those to edge my beds and create paths.

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    1. I had bricks as well, Peter. When I'd edged the shady bed I painted them in white to see them in darkness.

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  7. I love stones and boulders in the garden, they always look so natural. If they are big enough they are a great place to take a seat and admire the view! Happy October, Nadezda :)

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    1. Happy October to you too, Rosemary!

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  8. Welcome Nadezda
    Stones look beautiful in your garden.
    There are natural. I think that the flowers they like such an environment.
    I send greetings.
    Lucia

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    1. Yes, these stones are natural, Lucja.

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  9. I think rocks and stones add such nice variety to gardens, providing an interesting contrast to the colors.

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    1. You're right, Mary Anne, they really do.

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  10. Very nice! I like how you use the stones to mark the borders of your beds. Also the stone seahorse.

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    1. The seahorse is 'hardy' it stays there under the snow, Jason :0)

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  11. Hello Hadezda! I don't have a garden, unfortunately. Your photos are gorgeous, everything is so beautiful, and I love the seahorse! :)

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  12. Precioso diseño Nadezda. Esas piedras dan fortaleza a las plantas. Que verde más bonito.
    Buen fin de semana.
    Un beso.

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  13. What grand stones, and you have photographed them so well. They really set off the plants.

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  14. Yes, rocks are garden essentials and I have used them a lot in my sempervivum beds, as you know. And now I'm creating a new woodland bed between big rocks I happen to have in front of my house, just on the forest border. One fine day I hpe to have a limestone rockery for tinyest plants possible!

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    1. Yes, Tistou, I remember your sempervivum beds, and I can't wait to see your woodland bed!

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  15. Hello Nadezda girl !
    I really like your boulders ' stone work ! ... stone has a place in every garden. It accentuates an element of the earth which naturally goes with plants .. I can't imagine not having them in my garden in different shapes and sizes .. yours are beautiful and big and it must be amazing to find them in the woods like that .. here we have to buy them.
    Although years ago my Garden PA founds some gorgeous ones for me while he was on his way fishing in the different lakes surrounding Kingston ... I don't know how he carried them to be honest , they are huge !
    A garden isn't a garden without this element and you did very well girl !
    Take care
    Joy : )

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    1. You're right, Joy, all these stones and boulders I have in my garden are heavy. To move them I used had a hand-barrow and a helper. But stones go well to any garden.

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  16. PS ... I am totally in love with your seahorse !!!
    Joy : ) : )

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  17. Nadezda!
    I am very happy. You wrote the Polish nice comment.
    Thank you very much.
    Kisses and greetings.
    Lucja

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  18. Nadezda, Your garden is so beautiful !!!! You design beautifully planted with greenery and rocky scenery !!
    Greetings :)

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  19. All my borders in the back garden are edged with boulders Nadezda. I have sunk them just enough so the mower glides over them. My neighbour is the manager at a local quarry and I have been lucky to get most of my stone from there.
    I love your various use of stone elsewhere in your garden - especially with those evergreens. And of course the little sea horse. How sweet.

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    1. Oh, you're really lucky Angie! It's hard work to move boulders from the woods to the garden. This sea horse and rhododendrons look nice, I agree.

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  20. I can't imagine garden without any ock or boulder... We have here lot of them and I use them a lot too.
    You have lovely compositions of plants and rocks!

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